Alarm Cries Wolf in California Case Involving Privette Doctrine

Alarm clock in watercolor

Johnson v. The Raytheon Company, Inc. involves a false alarm. But not of the First Amendment kind.

May 6, 2019
Garret Murai - California Construction Law Blog

It’s one of the most quoted phrases in legal history: “Shouting fire in a [crowded] theater.”

It comes from the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark 1919 decision in Schenck v. U.S. and has come to stand for the proposition that not all speech, in particular dangerous speech, is protected by the First Amendment.

The next case also involves a false alarm. But not of the First Amendment kind.

In Johnson v. The Raytheon Company, Inc., California Court of Appeal for the Second District, Case No. B281411 (March 8, 2019), a false alarm investigated by maintenance engineering staff led to a Privette Doctrine claim against a property owner when a ladder on which the maintenance staff was standing slipped on wet flooring.

Johnson v. Raytheon
Lawrence Johnson worked as a maintenance engineer for ABM Facilities Services, Inc. ABM was hired by Raytheon Company, Inc. to staff the control room at one of Raytheon’s facilities in Southern California. Among other things, control room staff monitored water cooling towers owned by Raytheon to ensure that the water in the cooling towers were maintained at minimum levels.

Mr. Murai may be contacted at gmurai@wendel.com



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